Paintings from Sunset Series by Spence Munsinger, Color Field + Blank White Canvas + Realism + Contemporary Abstract Art, original paintings for sale

"I hate flowers - I paint them because they're cheaper than models and they don't move. ”
― Georgia O'Keeffe

Archives for June 2013

Bright, brilliant stark raving color…

 

Bright, brilliant, stark-raving color, "Paper" app on iPad, by spence munsinger

 

What I love about painting is color. Brilliant, bright, stark raving color, and for me, painting has always been that dimension.

In 7th grade I took a photography class. We were tasked with working with black & white film. The development and printing for black & white film are simpler than color, the equipment is less expensive. The demands in creating images are to work with shape and tone and composition, and learn the mechanics of exposure. I had a feeling of dismay, a visceral sinking deep in my stomach, at dropping away the medium of color.

It was anathema.

In painting classes, I took solace in the burnt umber shades and tones in under-paintings. At least they had that much soft warm brown, almost sepia, color left. Black and white and greys would have been much harder and harsher…

Black & white film was a huge adjustment, one it took more than the entire class semester to get over. I now love black and white photography.

 

B&W Photograph of glass vase by Spence Munsinger

B&W Photograph of glass vase

 

I love the dropping away of everything but tone and shadow and light and dark. It is the essentials of form. And it has a softness, like seeing in shadows, in the twilight. There’s a nostalgia to it now that was not there in my younger self. I saw the small 3″x4″ photographs of my family and childhood as a primitive graphic representation of a life lived, and I had the arrogant assumption of eternity and timelessness, the embrace of the vivid ethereal color available in color film.

But in painting – God I love color.

 

— spence

 

Sunset Over Butterfly Bluff

Sunset Over Butterfly Bluff, acrylic painting by Spence Munsinger

12″W x 16″H x 1.5″D, acrylic paints on gallery-wrap canvas. Protected by 2 coats isolation layers and one coat matte archival varnish.

Sunset Over Butterfly Bluff, acrylic painting by Spence MunsingerSunset Over Butterfly Bluff, acrylic painting by Spence Munsinger

Sun Behind House

A Painting A Day | Sun Behind House, acrylic painting by Spence Munsinger, color fields + realism + contemporary abstract art

 

12″W x 16″H x 1.5″D, acrylic paints on gallery-wrap canvas. Protected by 2 coats isolation layers and one coat matte archival varnish.

 

alt="AA Painting A Day | Sun Behind House, acrylic painting by Spence Munsinger, color fields + realism + contemporary abstract art

How I Painted “Veldt Sunset”

I’m trying to organize my Lightroom catalog – I think ultimately it gets divided. I’ve tried to diligently add key words and create collections, but ultimately too aften I guess and hunt and peck through images to find what I’m looking for.

I think divided into “Art and Related”, Photography, and Personal, something like that…

I have just over 31 thousand images. That’s after using a duplicate finding plugin and delting about 6500 images. I have found this photograph series, turning to capture the horizon and clouds, and then narrowing down to the sunset and trees that became this painting. I also found the process photos as each painting session was completed. Combined is a pretty complete process slideshow.

These weren’t taken with this kind of presentation in mind, and as I move forward, I’ll capture more time slices. The landscape photos were taken on a walk on the bluffs over Butterfly Beach, on a trail that runs through the Butterfly Preserve in Santa Barbara, California. The painting is both a sunset and a daily painting.

process-91
process-91

process-131
process-131

process-38
process-38

process-42
process-42

process-64
process-64

process-67
process-67

first_seven_daily-2
first_seven_daily-2

process_Veldt_Sunset-1
process_Veldt_Sunset-1

process_Veldt_Sunset-2
process_Veldt_Sunset-2

process_Veldt_Sunset-4
process_Veldt_Sunset-4

process_Veldt_Sunset-3
process_Veldt_Sunset-3

process_Veldt_Sunset-7
process_Veldt_Sunset-7

process_Veldt_Sunset-6
process_Veldt_Sunset-6

process_Veldt_Sunset-5
process_Veldt_Sunset-5

process_Veldt_Sunset-8
process_Veldt_Sunset-8

process_Veldt_Sunset-9
process_Veldt_Sunset-9

process_Veldt_Sunset-10
process_Veldt_Sunset-10

process_Veldt_Sunset-13
process_Veldt_Sunset-13

process_Veldt_Sunset-12
process_Veldt_Sunset-12

process_Veldt_Sunset-11
process_Veldt_Sunset-11

process_Veldt_Sunset-22
process_Veldt_Sunset-22

process_Veldt_Sunset-21
process_Veldt_Sunset-21

process_Veldt_Sunset-20
process_Veldt_Sunset-20

process_Veldt_Sunset-19
process_Veldt_Sunset-19

process_Veldt_Sunset-18
process_Veldt_Sunset-18

process_Veldt_Sunset-17
process_Veldt_Sunset-17

process_Veldt_Sunset-15
process_Veldt_Sunset-15

process_Veldt_Sunset-14
process_Veldt_Sunset-14

process_Veldt_Sunset-16
process_Veldt_Sunset-16

 

— spence

 

Stark and Simple…

After numerous re-writes and redo of child theme and code, I have…

Stark and minimal...

Stark and minimal…

 

I discovered the Genesis Framework. This is blessing and curse. I get to obsess about design itself, tweak the function and appearance, and leave the engineering alone, trusting it as robust and thorough. Genesis is a bare-bones theme, which comes alive when you either enable a child theme layered on top of it or build your own child theme to work with it. It’s fast. I rebuilt my website four times since last Thursday (5 days). I adapted and tweaked one child theme, scrapped it, started to create a child theme from scratch, gave up, created one child theme from scratch, scrapped that. I finally adapted a child theme with a specific design idea in mind, and an understanding of genesis I didn’t have when I started, and research for what I really really liked in an artist website. What worked and what fell flat.

I think the images have to lift a portfolio/artist/image-centric site up. The design for a portfolio site needs to be stark and minimal.

 

— spence

 

Sun on Sandstone Cliff

 

A Painting A Day | Sun on Sandstone Cliff, painting by Spence Munsinger, color fields + realism + contemporary abstract art

12″W x 16″H x 1.5″D, acrylic paints on gallery-wrap canvas. Protected by 2 coats isolation layers and one coat matte archival varnish.

 

A Painting A Day | Sun on Sandstone Cliff, painting by Spence Munsinger, color fields + realism + contemporary abstract art  A Painting A Day | Sun on Sandstone Cliff, painting by Spence Munsinger, color fields + realism + contemporary abstract art