Paintings from Sunset Series by Spence Munsinger, Color Field + Blank White Canvas + Realism + Contemporary Abstract Art, original paintings for sale

"Things are beautiful if you love them."
― Jean Anouilh

Dust of Everyday Living…

“Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.”
—Pablo Picasso

 

picasso at window

 

—spence

 

color…

Seek the strongest color effect possible… the content is of no importance.

Henri Matisse

 

The Desert Harmony in Red (Red Room)

The Desert Harmony in Red (Red Room) by Henri Matisse

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

—spence

 

Banksy

The Art we look at is made by only a select few.
A small group create, promote, purchase, exhibit and decide the success of Art.
Only a few hundred people in the world have any real say.
When you go to an Art gallery
you are simply a tourist looking at the trophy cabinet of a few millionaires…

— BANKSY

 

BANKSY | Removing Graffiti

BANKSY | Removing Graffiti

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

storytelling and play, two (or three) painters

“Edward hopper’s emotional storytelling with light, Picasso’s willingness to alter and reinvent form and perspective and to simply play, blatantly play with materials…”

I wrote that in an email from 2011, which ended up in the gmail “Drafts” folder – saved, but never sent or completed.

Nine months later I am not sure where it came from, what idea I was rolling around in that. I consider Hopper an influence because of the loneliness and solitude and timelessness of his images. His telling of a story.

There is the heartbreaking scene in a theatre of a woman, we can barely see her, she is off to the side of the theatre in an aisle away from the stage. Her body language says profound grief or disappointment. Was she an actress denied a part? A showgirl rejected as a professional or as a mistress? A wife or mother recovering from facing down her husband? There is a visual story right there, told but not completely and that storytelling demands the viewer add him or herself to the painting.

 

hoppermovie

 

That’s why I paint in gesture in abstract, in lucky placements of paint that follow an intention but not an exact intention and certainly not an exact attention or care. That feeling in painting, you can see it in Vermeer’s work – look in closely at some details and they aren’t there – they are suggested by the rhythm and the flow of the paint, but the actual detail you see isn’t precisely placed or even anything but shadow and change in tone.

 

vermeer_soldier

 

Picasso is both influence and inspiration. He continually found new ways of lookign at the world, and new ways of expressing that viewpoint, all the way to his passing. His work has a joy and a consistency despite the variety on its surface. Even at the death of his best friend there is a communication of possibility,

I have a film of Picasso “Le Mystere Picasso” from 1956. In the DVD Picasso brings brush strokes into life. At one point a painting is NOT going well, and his subtitled comment is “Oooohhhh. This is bad. Vary bad…” He played with paint, with vision and presented it well.

 

Le-Mysere-Picasso-Clouzot

 

 

—spence

 

Mike Kelley – viewing a dark lens

from L.A. Times 2 Feb:

Times art critic Christopher Knight wrote in 1994, “Kelley is an avatar of the power and humanity inherent in recognizing the radical impurity of human experience. His art searches out dark and soiled places where defects, fault lines and inadequacies are obvious and routine, and where failure takes on the poignant, fragile, even heartbreaking beauty that accompanies any loss of self.”

Looking at Mike Kelley’s face, the lines worn deep – sadness, depression? Demons reflected in his work.

Art like that impinges on the audience. Damien Hurst does the same without involvement, for money, to shock and titillate and to market. Mike Kelley’s face looks haunted, linked and held down by his work. “Escaped Bird” at least sees a light at the end of the tunnel. Introspection to find the reflection of emotion from a color or a sunset or even a death. Twist through the pathways of that emotion for a meadow or two. Then run for the exit. Too much journeying deep into the recesses of the psyche just strengthens the parts you can’t really view and see and those are the dark ones.

I would prefer to reach beyond the experience of being just human, the messy brutal and short existence here, and reach for a beauty that reaches beyond even a contentment with being human and on earth. I want to find that delight, that tickle at the top of the spine that becomes goosebumps when we glimpse something ethereal, transcendent. I can’t see a value in wallowing in muck – I find that easy, obvious. I think art has to reach beyond the constraints of flesh and material and into the spirit, beyond the physical.

Wallowing in the mud is the job of the turtle supporting the four elephants on its back that hold up the world…

—spence

butterfly girl

Bantam Books put out a paper-bound book called “The Fantastic Art of Frank Frazetta” in 1975. My original copy of the book is long gone. I remember his paintings vividly, from the covers of the Edgar Rice Burrough’s Tarzan series and the John Carter of Mars books, and from this paperback art book.

One of the drawings, three pages in, on the Introduction page, was a quick sketch. I’ve never seen it in any other publication. I copied it from the book to hang above my desk, in ink on newsprint, and it did hang there for at least a decade. In some move or another, the drawing disappeared.

I’d thought about it. I found a copy of the original book on ebay, purchased it. The drawing means mystery, enigma, balance, life, simplicity of line and form. It is one piece of art I would not want to be without.

butterfly girl

 

— spence