Paintings from Sunset Series by Spence Munsinger, Color Field + Blank White Canvas + Realism + Contemporary Abstract Art, original paintings for sale

"I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn't say any other way - things I had no words for."
― Georgia O'Keeffe

street photography in louisville

 

louisville image

I took a Canon EOS3 film SLR camera and a Canon 24-70mm f2.8 L lens to Louisville, Kentucky. I brought a digital SLR as well. I didn’t end up using the digital much at all.

I brought both a 35mm Black and White film, and a very good 35mm color film. I shot none of the color. I shot five 36 exposure rolls of the B&W.

The Black & White film was Arista EDU 200, an inexpensive house brand sold by Freestyle Photo, in Hollywood, CA. I’ve shot a couple of rolls of this film in medium format, and I found it interesting. For street photography in a town with an older architecture, a mixture of French and American-Southern building styles, it rocks.

It rocks because it has the look of 1940’s Kodak black and white film. The film emulsion, the plastic stuff holding the chemistry, is a clear blue. The chemistry isn’t modern, and the developed negatives show an uneven imperfect distribution of grain. The film is sourced as from the Czech Republic, which would likely make it Fomapan Creative 200 film. I like the look. Alot.

louisville image

My favorite modern B & W film is Kodak TMax TMY400 – this stuff is extremely sharp, perfect contrast, greys that cascade through the image. It has a modern look though. T-Grain films came out in the 1980’s, and are dramatically sharper than Arista EDU.

Arista EDU 200 is high contrast and high grain. I developed these rolls in Kodak D76 1:1 (diluted 1 to 1 with water) at 9 munites and 30 seconds – the D76 takes the edge off the contrast. The grain becomes a part of the art of the image. The look complements the subject matter.

louisville image

 

— spence

artist@spencemunsinger.com
spencemunsinger.com

photograph: shoes

20070922_BW_Mamiya_RZ67_0001_200.jpg

At the edge of town there is a park with a soccer field and sandy beach and an area for swimming. The pond is a mile and a half to two miles across, expanding into wetlands in the south and east. Around it runs a trail. On one side there are the remains of… a pier? A water pump facility? What’s left are two concrete walls extending to the edge of the water, with two shorter walls boxing in a square filled with dirt perhaps 15 feet on a side.

The texture captured by the B&W film of the concrete. The shallow depth of field from the 110mm lens on the camera, causing the focus to be very specific. The Keds sneakers, balanced on the wall, are timeless. Everyone has that little kid in them, or should, that sees a flat place on a wall, leaps up and walks along balancing.

 

— spence

artist@spencemunsinger.com
spencemunsinger.com


 

technical…

This was taken with Fuji Neopan 400 B&W film, developed for 9-3/4 minutes at 68 degrees in Kodak D76 developer. The camera was a Mamiya RZ67 Pro II medium format with an f2.8 110mm (normal) lens. I’m not certain if I had a yellow filter on this lens at this time – my best guess would be no, there was not a filter. This is scanned with an Epson V750 flatbed in a custom medium format film holder.

 

a tangle of woods in snow

This was RZ67 6cm x 7cm on Kodak TMY400. These negatives are proportionally 8″ x 10″, they show beautifully without any cropping needed.

a tangle of woods in snow

a tangle of woods in snow

— spence

artist@spencemunsinger.com
spencemunsinger.com

black lines white snow #8

black lines white snow #8

black line white snow #8

— spence

artist@spencemunsinger.com
spencemunsinger.com

black lines white snow #7

The texture captured by 6cm x 7cm Kodak TMY400 film is just outstanding. This tree twisting up out of the snow, with the smaller more graceful twisting branches, up out of the white field of the (freshly fallen)snow.

When I first printed negatives, I looked for the point at which I wanted to crop to a better picture – these days, after working with medium format, I’m very reluctant to crop out a better composition. Which means getting is more closely correct when the photograph is taken. The barest trace of the film id is visible at the top, as well as the slight uptwist in the upper right corner, which is characteristic of this specific camera. I’m trying to leave the film as is, as scanned – I think it adds character.

black lines white snow #7

black lines white snow #7

— spence

artist@spencemunsinger.com
spencemunsinger.com

black lines white snow #3

The detail and the subtleness of the greys in the trunk of the tree make that front tree look almost pasted onto the scene. That’s characteristic of the B&W film used, in combination with D76 Kodak developer. It grabs and accentuates subtle shades, making them just pop out.

The tree seems to twist out of the ground.

black lines white snow #3

black lines white snow #3

— munsinger

artist@spencemunsinger.com
spencemunsinger.com